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    avacad0
    Participant

    I used to think that being depressed means that you can’t function. Your entire life stops. I’ve learnt that there are many levels of depression. Some people don’t know why they have this constant sluggish feeling of dragging themselves to places where they need to be and viewing every single thing in life as a chore to just be over and done with. It is a symptom sometimes of severe feelings of sadness and worthlessness which pulls the person down and makes them have no energy or drive to anything other than what they are forced to accomplish. Does this resonate with anyone? I would love to know that there are people out there that can relate to these feelings?

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    Chavy
    Participant

    Hi Avocadoe,

    Yes, I definitely do experience feeling sluggish and just not in the mood of doing anything. I do have thryoid issues which could make me feel that way. I’m not a doctor, but it could be worth checking it out (to rule it out) if the feelings are constant. When I feel this way, I usually sit on the couch, read, listen to music or just do nothing. It’s important to give ourselves a break (i’m only realizing this at I’m typing this). I then just put music on and visualize myself doing what I wanted to do which helps. Sometimes, we just have to force ourselves to just get up and make that first move. I also do a lot of self-talk. I hope this helps!

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    anonymous
    Participant

    Hi I feel this way sometimes too ,and self-talk can help me realize what the trigger was. So i then know what I need to deal with( our emotions do not like to be ignored)

    Love this thread 🙂

    @avacod0 you are right! There is a form of depression that in a way is more insidious and it presents itself in a less severe though chronic feelings of sluggishness, hopelessness, misery, basically feeling blue on a constant basis. The official term for around the issue you’re describing (although I’m not diagnosing) is dysthymia. Though labels and categories are less important it is helpful to know that this is so common there is an official term for it.


    @chavy
    great point you make here. Hormones play a role in our moods and sometimes hormonal shifts even if they are not thyroid issues will impact or moods. If it’s not a thyroid issue and just a hormonal time, or an external trigger,   acknowledging this and becoming aware is the first step in feeling better. I like the idea of giving yourself time to relax and accepting that you deserve a break and it’s ok to be, act, and feel sluggish sometimes. After say 30 minutes (or as long as you want/need) it is also brilliant to visualize what you want to do and try to accomplish it. Make it fun if you can e.g. reward yourself after.


    @anonymous
    Like you said – feelings hate to be ignored. They like to be recognized and then let go to be free so new ones can come. Sometimes we hold onto the negative feelings because they’re so awful and we’re afraid they’ll never go away on their own. So we harp on them and try to explain them away, all in attempt to get rid of them. Ironically, if we would simply let them come (easier said than done) and then go (also easier said than done) there would be space for a pleasant feeling or two. Positive feelings, like negative feelings also come and go, as this is the nature of feelings.

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    avacad0
    Participant
    Topic Author

    Thank you for all the ideas and thoughts! I will definitely be on the lookout for all of the above.

    Awesome! you got this.

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    anonymous
    Participant

    @anonymous Like you said – feelings hate to be ignored. They like to be recognized and then let go to be free so new ones can come. Sometimes we hold onto the negative feelings because they’re so awful and we’re afraid they’ll never go away on their own. So we harp on them and try to explain them away, all in attempt to get rid of them. Ironically, if we would simply let them come (easier said than done) and then go (also easier said than done) there would be space for a pleasant feeling or two. Positive feelings, like negative feelings also come and go, as this is the nature of feelings.

    Wow ! You hit it right on the nail! I definitely find it very hard after years of denying my feelings , to allow my true feelings to come  up,although it’s probably an important step in order to be able to move on.

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    avacad0
    Participant
    Topic Author

    I do have a tendency to suppress my feelings since they tend to cause me a lot of pain and discomfort. And also since this has been my coping mechanism for years because of family dynamics…. I am trying really hard to become friends with my feelings and not to view it as a monster which invaded my territory.

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    anonymous
    Participant

     

    I do have a tendency to suppress my feelings since they tend to cause me a lot of pain and discomfort. And also since this has been my coping mechanism for years because of family dynamics…. I am trying really hard to become friends with my feelings and not to view it as a monster which invaded my territory.

    I can totally relate to that. It takes a lot of strength, courage to change the status quo. Wish you success.

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    imabitweird
    Participant

    I can relate to this (dysthymia).  There is someone in my family with thyroid-related issues as well and I’ve wondered if it’s related.

    On acknowledging feelings — my current take (which i’ve never really talked about) is that feelings are learned (trained) reactions…they get stronger as a situation repeats and I continue to interpret it the same way, even if there are other interpretations that I’m acknowledging more readily.

    I haven’t done much of anything in maybe four years.  Was flunking classes in college, and now I’m living on my own and having trouble getting myself to find work or even do laundry…since there are plenty of good moments, I’ve generally put the blame on myself rather than calling it any sort of depression.

    Recently stuff keeps happening that makes me break down crying…so wondering if this (grief,helplessness,sadness) is how i’ve felt all along without choosing to notice it.

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    Hello1
    Participant

    @imabitweird I can relate to you’re take on feelings. I think feelings can be a learned reaction as well. I personally find it hard to get that perfect balance between identifying feelings so I’m not denying them but also not allowing them to take control over me and turn into depression or chronic sadness. I’m confused about what you mean by not doing anything for 4 years and also you say you’ve been having good moments. Like it sounds like you’re struggling now because you’ve experienced much transition and change in the last few months/years. I think That is growth even if there is pain and you’re not seeing the fruits of your labor yet. Maybe now you’re beginning to get in touch with the difficult feelings and although it feels terrible it’s not a bad thing. Question is how to deal with these feelings best…

    @imabitweird I appreciate your thoughts on feelings being learned reactions. I’d like to challenge your thinking on not doing much of anything in 4 years. As hello1 shared, it sounds like you’ve gone through many transitions and perhaps were struggling to acknowledge difficult feelings that would’ve prevented you from coping. Maybe now that you’ve gotten more used to life as you know it the feelings are beginning to surface. That’s ok and perhaps it means you’re ready to deal with them on some level.

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    imabitweird
    Participant

    Thank you @Fay and @hello1 — I appreciate what both of you wrote but need to think it over for a while. 🙂  I think the reason I say I “haven’t done much of nothing” is because the reasons I made the transitions I did over the past few years were mostly not things I’m good at feeling in the moment, not then and not now.  Maybe once I let myself feel settled/at home somewhere I will be able to think back and be glad about everything.  It’s a comforting thought at least 🙂

    Ahh I think I hear what you’re saying. Remember – doing and feeling are 2 different things. So even though it feels right now and perhaps frequently that you’ve done nothing, when you look at the facts they suggest otherwise. This circles back to what you shared initially, that perhaps there’s an underlying mood/sadness/grief issue that’s preventing you from experiencing the positive aspects of your journey.  It sounds like now that you’re more aware you may be in a better position to address it. Try to be patient and compassionate with yourself, always!

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    Chavy
    Participant

    Hello1, I copied and pasted this part of your response (I don’t know how to quote it without the copying and pasting).

    I personally find it hard to get that perfect balance between identifying feelings so I’m not denying them but also not allowing them to take control over me and turn into depression or chronic sadness. 

    I try to acknowledge my feelings, sit with them (very hard!), think about what triggered them, do self talk, or journal… Once I did that (experiencing the feeling) I feel it’s time for me to move on. I don’t have this down pat at all, but I try to do that. Once I find myself thinking and ruminating about the same thought/situation, I try to refocus myself.

    Just a disclaimer, I don’t do this as much as I should be doing and don’t have it down pat at all. I just don’t want to come across the wrong way.

    I hope this helps!!

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