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    undecided
    Participant

    Hi,
    I’m wondering if anyone here has experience with a parent on the spectrum, especially if that parent is not diagnosed.

    I guess I’m just curious how it impacted you, and how you deal with it.
    Did you ever bring it up to your parent? If so, did it help anything?
    How do you reconcile the impact with knowing that everything was probably well-meant, and that you now have a context for things that you might not have had as a kid?

    Hello! While I don’t have experience with this, this reddit discussion may be a great place for you to get some answers! Hope this helps!

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    undecided
    Participant
    Topic Author

    Thank you
    Nice to see other people know what I’m talking about, just wish someone could tell me what to do… oh well 🙂

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    Chavy
    Participant

    Wow, that is really, really difficult and painful to hear and for you as a mother and daughter. As a mother for you to manage this for your child and for you to watch your mother cry over her grief.
    Im not sure what your feelings about this are, but I’m assuming it’s not pleasant ones.

    I’m by no means a professional, but maybe you can validate yourself about how painful and hard this is, and maybe you can even share validation skills with your mother to help her cope with her grief (if that’s what she needs and if that’s something you can do).

    I really wish you much success in navigating this, and know that you’re not alone in this at all. I hope this helps you a bit.

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    everydayjewishmom
    Participant

    In response to Chavy's post #11753:

    Whoa. No one involved in this situation is upset. My mother isn’t sad. She felt validated and seen. We’re not in pain or suffering and neither are our loved ones who are autistic. I suspect that your reaction to my post is based on your assumptions about autism. Autism is a disorder with a lot of stigma around it. This stigma means that many people with lower support needs (or women) often go undiagnosed. Understanding our own needs and our loved ones needs better is nothing but a blessing.

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    Chavy
    Participant

    I’m sorry for misinterpreting the reason you wrote in. People usually write for empathy and validation, so I assumed that’s what you were looking for, but I see I was very wrong. I also wasn’t expecting such a  reaction for trying to support you.

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    everydayjewishmom
    Participant

    This reply has been reported for inappropriate content.

    In response to Chavy's post #11758:

    I’m new here. Perhaps this is not the place for me.

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    Chavy
    Participant

    I think everyone is welcome here. It’s a space to vent and share difficulties.
    I was just replying with the assumption that this is difficult for you, but I assumed wrongly.

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    everydayjewishmom
    Participant

    In response to undecided's post #10174:

    Hey! I have a similar experience, if you’re still interested

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    everydayjewishmom
    Participant

    In response to Anonymous's post #11752:

    Moderator, Can you please erase this post. I realize now that I’m uncomfortable publicly sharing this information

    In response to everydayjewishmom's post #11764:

    Hi everydayjewishmom,

     

    I deleted your post per your request.

     

    You are very welcome here!

     

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    undecided
    Participant
    Topic Author

    In response to everydayjewishmom's post #11762:

    hey, I’ve been off line for the past little bit, only just saw this… still interested if you’re interested in sharing 🙂

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