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    Fay Brezel
    Admin
    Topic Author
    Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses; they are not a lifestyle choice or a diet gone ‘too far’ – nedc
     
    While the above is true, there is a wide spectrum with eating disorders. And, while spectrums further complicate matters they also provide a sense of relief.
     
    Not every diet turns into anorexia and bulimia and overeating on occasion is a normal part of life.
     
    Eating from a tub of ice cream when you ‘get dumped’ and celebrating your birthday with a cake smash do not qualify for binge eating disorder.
     
    On a more serious note, we know too many who struggle with their weight, shape, size, diet, and exercise, and the preoccupation appears to be and most often is – unhealthy.
     
    Whether food and eating issues are full blown disorders or not, these symptoms and preoccupations veil underlying issues and concerns.
     
    Hence, treatment is two fold:
     
    First, managing the symptoms.
     
    Second, addressing the underlying emotional fuel for the symptoms and discovering adaptive methods for dealing with these underlying issues.
     
    If you’d like to know more about the diagnostic criteria for the different eating disorders, this article provides a clear overview.
     
     
    This is space is for you if you or someone you love struggles with:
     
    * a specific eating disorder
    * disordered eating thoughts and/or behaviors
    * preoccupation with food, diet, body weight and shape
    * excessive exercise
     
    Support yourself and others by subscribing to this category so you can join the conversation at any time.
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    RomanticYente
    Participant

    I have been anorexic twice in my life, close to 3 times. The first time I was able to gain the weight back and have a healthy relationship with food. The second time was about 5 years ago and the third time was about 2 years ago when I had a long term relationship end. After these last two times, I was able to get back to a normal weight but I can feel that I still have disordered thoughhts about food and my relationship is not healthy. I get upset at myself when I indulge, I try and limit “bad” foods that I put in my body and follow all kinds of ridiculous trends. I’m always hesistant to go out to eat with friends because I know that I will eat too much. And then there is exercise. I am a dancer so I take a lot of classes to train but I will go to the gym and do extra just to burn more calories, which I know is putting my body under tremendous stress. I weigh myself too often to even say how much I do. I don’t want to think/feel like this. Would love to hear what people have to say on this.

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    CTab
    Participant

    I am a dancer so I take a lot of classes to train but I will go to the gym and do extra just to burn more calories, which I know is putting my body under tremendous stress. I weigh myself too often to even say how much I do.

    This seems to be the running trend for dancers and, frankly, I think it’s too high a price to pay for following something you’re clearly passionate in. Not saying it’s the root cause but that’s a pretty toxic environment for someone who’s struggled with anorexia to work in.

    Maybe a small first step to take could be getting rid of your scale? Take away those little reminders that snowball into distracting thoughts and stress. Hope this helps!

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    alwaysworried
    Participant

    In response to RomanticYente's post #5249:

    Its apparent from the way you shared that you are aware that your behaviors are unhealthy and still from the eating disorder remnants. I think that s a huge first step. I wonder if you feel ready to take smaller steps to change. Maybe throwing out the scale is too large but limiting how many times you weigh yourself a day or week? I think many people who don’t even have or have had full blown eating disorders struggle with all the hype around scales food and calories its almost impossible not to in todays day…

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    RomanticYente
    Participant

    Yes, I agree. I think there is too much focus on the scale in todays day. I do feel like I’ve been better and havent been looking at it a lot but i cant seem to stop obsessing over food and feeling guilty if i eat something “bad”

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    splitandtrying2bme
    Participant

    This is so sad. Disordered eating struggles are so hard. And draining.

    I just started counting calories again, after a long period of time that I was pretty stable, and its getting at me. I try to let go of the idea and all the food obsessing, but it feels like I’m so attached to it, need it and can’t give it up.

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    Lisa B Ogorek
    Participant

    This sounds really challenging. Have you tried eating on more of a schedule?  And even scheduling a healthy snack in between meals?  This can help you pay more attention to what you’re eating throughout the day, and help you avoid those foods that make you feel guilty afterward…

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    splitandtrying2bme
    Participant

    In response to Lisa B Ogorek's post #6948:

    I dont think my issue is about not paying attention and then regretting it, its more about being overly focused and counting everything I eat so I dont eat “too much” for my standard. I wish I could let go of obsessing so much. And wish to just be able to eat what I want and feel intuitively like I used to.

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    splitandtrying2bme
    Participant

    In response to Lisa B Ogorek's post #6948:

    I really appreciate you responding. Thanks.

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    Chavy
    Participant

    In response to splitandtrying2bme's post #6937:

    @splitandtrying2bme, welcome to this forum! Your struggle is indeed very hard. I’ve been struggling a lot and still am and I’ve come to the realization that acceptance is key and crucial. Acceptance of anything is so important to help moving forward. I would say that the first step might be to acknowledge and accept the that you’re really struggling with this. It’s a real battle. Also, I want to point out that I’m talking about acceptance in DBT terms. Meaning, that acceptance doesn’t mean liking, agreeing or approving of your situation. It’s simply acknowledging that it’s a part of your experience. Perhaps by accepting this difficulty, you’ll be making “room” for more effective and healthier behaviors? Maybe after you try some acceptance work, the obsessions around food will lessen?

    I hope I’m making sense and coming across compassionately and clearly.

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    Chavy
    Participant

    One last thing that might help is to possibly explore why you feel attached to food and what you could put in its place. Maybe you could take a big deep breath before eating something and then deciding if it’s worth it.

    I know that I struggle with this a lot on Shabbos morning. I don’t usually eat a healthy breakfast and usually find myself eating more cake then I’d like too! It’s definitely NOT a good feeling at all. I tell myself that each Shabbos will be different, but that’s yet to happen… maybe I should take my own advice more seriously ?

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    splitandtrying2bme
    Participant

    Haha..I believe that when giving others encouragement it also helps for yourself, so I hope that you are able to achieve what you want too!

    In response to splitandtrying2bme’s post #6937:

    @splitandtrying2bme, welcome to this forum! Your struggle is indeed very hard. I’ve been struggling a lot and still am and I’ve come to the realization that acceptance is key and crucial. Acceptance of anything is so important to help moving forward. I would say that the first step might be to acknowledge and accept the that you’re really struggling with this. It’s a real battle. Also, I want to point out that I’m talking about acceptance in DBT terms. Meaning, that acceptance doesn’t mean liking, agreeing or approving of your situation. It’s simply acknowledging that it’s a part of your experience. Perhaps by accepting this difficulty, you’ll be making “room” for more effective and healthier behaviors? Maybe after you try some acceptance work, the obsessions around food will lessen? I hope I’m making sense and coming across compassionately and clearly.

    your being super compassionate.. thanks. I know acceptance is really really important. I do have to work on that. Though what stops me, is that part of me is still in denial that I’m in this place. I keep my struggles to myself and barely anyone from my real close relationships know the intensity of what is going on. So I’m left hiding it and living 2 worlds, and its so much harder to then accept it. Because I’m totally totally not even recognizing the struggle with my full self. Makes sense?

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    Keepsmiling
    Participant

    Hi,

    I was wondering if anyone knows the early signs of an eating disorder? (Before it becomes a full fledge eating disorder).

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    splitandtrying2bme
    Participant

    Hi,

    There are many different symptoms that can be signs to a developing eating disorder, and the context here matters a lot. There are also different types of eating disorders so it would be hard to sum up all the signs.

    Do you have specific behaviors that are concerning you about somebody?

    In general, obsessing / over forcusing about food in some way or another can be a sign to unhealthy eating habits. Focusing too much on body weight and body image can also be concerning. Denying oneslef specific food groups, expressing a desire to starve/ purge would also be signs. So its really a matter of what the behavior is and in what context.

    What I wrote here is very general amd I strongly recommend that if your concened about yourself or someone else- that you contact a professional who deals with disordered eating / eating disorder issues.

    I hope this helps somewhat…❤️

     

    Hello KeepSmiling,

    I really like the question as awareness and prevention are often the key factors in helping prevent a crisis. An eating disorder usually stems from an unhealthy relationship with food. The symptoms such as; restricting, binging, purging, etc… are only signs that something is troubling the person and therefore they are relating to food in an unhealthy way. That being said, I would say an early symptom may relate to body image, emotional irregulation, as well as the classic symptoms. If you find that you or someone you know may be showing signs of an eating disorder that is usually indicative that something is bothering them on an emotional level. I would suggest you go to the cause and try to address what may be upsetting this person. Addressing the root of the issue in an honest and authentic manner may be your best bet as a first step.

    I hope this is helpful,
    Chaya Rochel

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