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  • This topic has 31 replies, 7 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by Profile PhotoChavy.
  • Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)
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    Chavy
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    Hi all,

    So it’s still rough for me, but a little easier. I just wish I wouldn’t keep turning to others to help me (or even sharing how I’m feeling) and ask myself instead more often, “what do you need”?. I really have the answers, but being that I’m very worried and overly obsessive about returning to work due to my high anxiety, it seems to take up most of my brain space and hard to talk about other things. I guess that’s normal because I am facing a very overwhelming decision to make, but still, it’s so hard.

    I was just picking up something from an event called Flatbush Together, and there were 2 social workers there. They facilitate this organization, or at least one of them does. So of course, I felt myself being drawn to them, mentally, because they’re therapists, so they can help me, but obviously, that would not be appropriate. It’s more of my dependency playing here.

    I’m not even sure if writing here is a form of dependency, or just getting my feelings and thoughts out, but either way, I needed to do something.
    I just really, really want to fully get back to myself, with all my medication changes being made and be more self reliant.

    Chavy, your self-awareness is very impressive. I hope you can recognize that and feel proud of yourself and your progress.

    I also think checking in with yourself and asking “what do I need” is excellent. Spend time with that question and see what comes up. Perhaps journaling with that prompt can help you go deeper.

    Lastly, I believe using this space to share your thoughts and feelings is a healthy outlet especially when it comes from a place of  ‘I need to share my thoughts…’ (which Is what I am hearing in your post above) instead of from a place of ‘I need to be answered in a specific way…’ I hope that makes sense.

    I am rooting for you.

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    Thank you!!

    Yes, I was using this space to air out my thoughts and feelings. Kind of like journaling.
    But what do you mean by needing to be answered in a specific way?

    Chavy, I hope you’re already doing better since you posted.

    I think you hit the nail on the head in the title of your post, as you cleverly spelled out – the more we try to ‘control’ our anxiety, the more it ends up showing who’s in charge!

    I’m wondering if, paradoxically, fully entering into some of your fears may actually calm you down; kind of like exposure therapy.

     

    Good luck!

     

    In response to Chavy's post #11784:

    Hi Chavy,

    I hope that you have found some techniques to help you calm down, because, as you mentioned in your original post, anxiety is so draining and exhausting.  I get that.  It might help you to learn about how there are two sources of anxiety triggers in our brains; the cortex and the amygdala.  Many of the approaches that therapists generally use involve treatment for the cortex; which is our logic, thinking part of our brain.  Those include CBT and DBT.  The surprising part is that many therapists stop there and don’t focus on the amygdala (experience based anxiety), when the amygdala is the part of the brain that actually triggers the anxiety responses in our bodies; ie tightened muscles, sweating, fast reactions, etc.  Furthermore, even cortex based anxiety involves the amygdala at the end of the day.  So in order to really help your anxiety, you might need to learn how to treat and rewire the amygdala part of your brain.  The ways to calm your amygdala are getting enough sleep, exercising, deep breathing, etc.  And exposure therapy really targets the amygdala in a very real way.

    Good luck!

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    Topic Author

    Hi @Shoshanaort,

    Thanks so much for your response and support! So, if I understand correctly, you’re saying that CBT and DBT don’t treat heavy anxiety because it’s in the amygdala? I’m a little confused… Maybe you can break down cortex and amygdala based anxiety and how deep breathing can help?

    And yes, anxiety is draining, but thank god, I’m feeling a bit better.

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    In response to Yehuda (Hudi) Kowalsky's post #11893:

    Hi!

    Yes, b”H, I am feeling a little bit better since the time I had posted, but it’s still very much there. Yeah, I do want to delve into some of my other fears and do exposure work with my therapist. I have this thing where I tend to get intimidated by people, (it’s also part of OCD), and I think it goes back to my childhood experiences of being afraid/intimidated by my uncles… So, every time I get an intrusive thought to be intimidated by someone because they project a lot of confidence, or somehow have the same persona as other people I’m intimidated by, I get extremely scared and anxious. It sounds funny, but I actually just want to do this already because I see how it really is distressing for me. I had this same thing just yesterday where our tour guide (we’re out of town now), reminded me of my uncle and his persona and aura really scared me….

    Don’t know if you’re following me, but that’s what I really want to work on.

    In response to Chavy's post #11937:

    Hi Chavy,

    To explain what I was saying in my previous post, the way to deal with the anxiety doesn’t depend on the intensity of the anxiety; but rather where it’s stemming from.

    There are 2 main pathways to anxiety in the brain:

    Cortex-cognitive, thoughts, logic, reasoning, etc.

    Amygdala-based on experiences and emotional memories.  The Amygdala is the cause for the anxiety feelings in the body, ie tense muscles, sweating, confusion, nausea, etc. (many times generalized anxiety comes from here).

    You would usually use CBT and DBT to treat cortex based anxiety, and EXPOSURE therapy, along with deep  breathing, exercise, staying away from high sugary foods, etc (there are more things to do for this) to help with the amygdala based anxiety.

    I hope this is more clear.  Let me know if you have any other questions.

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    So DBT is cortex anxiety based, and anxiety is amygdala based, so using DBT for managing (extreme) anxiety won’t be as effective? Exposure therapy is only for Amygdala based anxiety? I’m doing DBT now, and TIPP is a skill that changes your chemistry, so that one’s anxiety can go down very quickly from a 10 to a 6 or 7. DBT won’t work because it’s amygdala based?

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    I mean it’s cortex anxiety.

    In response to Chavy's post #11957:

    Hi,

    As I stated in the post before this one, it doesn’t make a difference in terms of the severity of the anxiety when we are discussing which treatment would work best for the anxiety you’re experiencing.

    Anxiety stems from 1 of 2 main places in the brain:

    1. cortex-which is much more cognitive (thoughts) (and people are much more aware of the reasons for these anxieties)
    2. Amygdala-these are formed from emotional experiences that many people are not aware of.

    The amygdala is the cause for the anxious feelings (it sets off the nervous system and causes the sweaty feelings, heart palpitations, etc).

    It’s important to know where you’re anxiety is stemming from, because the cortex and amygdala require different treatment to help calm them down.  Reducing the anxiety will only work if you are “healing” the correct place.

    One of the ways of working with amygdala based anxiety is through exposure therapy.

    I hope this clarifies things.

     

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
    Participant
    Topic Author

    So DBT helps when it’s Cortex-based anxiety or Amygdala-based Anxiety?

    In response to Chavy's post #12019:

    yes

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    Topic Author

    Yes to both?

    Profile Photo
    Chavy
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    Sorry for this back and forth!

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