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  • This topic has 11 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by Profile Photorina.
  • Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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    Openminded
    Participant

    every day i think my issue is diffrent one day its rocd the bext day its trauma the next day its low self esteem the next day its just bad relationship anyone have this my head feels like its about to snap

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    Chavy
    Participant

    Wow! That sounds so, so hard to deal with! I’m not dealing with that, but I am dealing with intense anxiety and every day is a different story. Some days (like today) are better, and some days are anxiety-filled. It’s very frustrating!

    Are you seeing a therapist who can help you work through this?

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    Openminded
    Participant
    Topic Author

    Yes but just so much to unpack and i always doubt what they say and what i say

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    Bracha Weiss
    Participant

    Hi,

    This sounds so incredibly difficult! Sometimes it feels like a clear cut diagnosis would just solve everything, because at least then you would know exactly what is wrong.

    Something I often suggest to my clients- we can get lost in feelings. Sometimes it’s important to do more, and focus outward instead of in. Thinking and feeling are both important, but we get stuck. When was the last time you took a walk or read a captivating book? Try to do something disconnected from all the internal confusion for a bit, to give yourself a break and allow yourself to reenter that space from a renewed space.

    Hope this helps,

    B. Weiss

     

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    Openminded
    Participant
    Topic Author

    Yea have to start exercising saw a article in the atlantic that it helps alot have to start doing that

    Dear Openminded,

    That sounds really tough. Not knowing what’s happening and feeling like things shift quickly can feel like things are out of your control, which can lead to feelings of worry and sadness. Just so you know, research clearly shows that getting a diagnosis can be helpful to a client’s healing, so it may be a good idea to ask your therapist for a diagnosis and ask WHY this is happening.

    No matter the diagnosis, I’m glad you posted! Having a community and coming out of isolation and expressing your thoughts is healing in and of itself. Hopefully, you will gain something from reading these answers.

    There are a couple of no-cost things to do daily, which, when combined, can shift your nervous system from feeling worried/confused to a state of being embodied. Embodied means that you feel more safe inhabiting your body, and that you learn that, to use a great metaphor, you are the mountain and your feelings are the weather. The mountain is strong, immovable, and does not change with different types of weather, i.e. burning sun, pouring rain, snow piles. Similarly, you can learn to observe your thoughts and not BE your thoughts. Another word for this is mindfulness.

    Here  are a couple of ideas for a morning routine many of my clients have implemented when they were struggling:

    a. Journal, journal, journal. Having a journal where you have a tangible place to record your journey and what you are feeling gives you a chance to observe your feelings. It’s free therapy! Writing things down can also support you in your journey, help with courage and clarity, and offer you hope as you see shifts along the way. It can also help you track patterns in your life.

    B. Try some form of yoga in the morning. 15 minutes is enough to help you settle into your body. YouTube has some great videos. There’s lots of different types, so try ‘morning yoga’ or ‘restorative yoga’ to start. Learning to gently move and inhabit your body helps with feeling worthy and more in control.

    C. Have an easy and healthy breakfast. I know it sounds obvious and super simple, but taking care of yourself in the morning can lead to feeling more successful during the day.

    Wishing you lots of success on your journey,

    Zipa Leah Scheinberg

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    Openminded
    Participant
    Topic Author

    Thank you for those tips ill try to implement them

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    melissa
    Participant

    Just so you know, research clearly shows that getting a diagnosis can be helpful to a client’s healing, so it may be a good idea to ask your therapist for a diagnosis and ask WHY this is happening.

     

    I know that understanding what’s going on is always helpful, but isn’t a human being, a lifetime of experiences, so much more complex than a formal diagnosis?

    @openminded, are you new to therapy?

    I also used to torture myself with intellectualizing everything. Is it this? Is it that?

    It took many months for me to trust the experience and move into my body and emotions and out of my head.

    It wasn’t about… is it anxiety, depression, trauma, personality… it became (and I’m by far not there yet), let me accept what’s going on and learn to work with it.

    It was no longer about logically giving everything a name but submitting myself to the experience and allowing myself to slowly, slowly — painstakingly so — trust the process, my therapist, and my experiences for what they are.

    It was not longer about rushing to unpack every issue I have in life, but trusting that things naturally come up and healing takes time. (So much time…)

    I hope your therapist will help you create a safe space to discover it all.

     

     

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    if-the-stars-align
    Participant

    In response to melissa's post #13653:

    I have to say, this really resonates with me. At one point I was pushing for a diagnosis – I thought it would help me fit everything neatly into a box and I’d be able to tie a pretty bow on top and call myself fixed, healed.

    My therapist kept telling me that diagnoses are perfect for billing insurance but not as much for healing… Humans are more complex than the DSM likes to portray.

    That being said, I think it’s normal for all sorts of things to come up while doing work in therapy. Or even if you’re not in therapy but in a hyper-aware stage, where you’re delving into yourself and wondering why you do certain things and act in a certain way.

    Best wishes for inner peace and acceptance!! Sending love ❤️

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    melissa
    Participant

    In response to if-the-stars-align's post #13657:

     

    Beautiful! You put into words what I couldn’t.

    How wonderful it would be for us to fit into a little box.

    Actually not! Perhaps this little box that I don’t want to fit into is what I’m protesting my hole life?

     

    *I came back to fix my typo of “hole” – but then I decided that it’s quite an apt typo, so I’ll leave it. 😉

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    funbubby
    Participant

    Hey I’m currently in therapy and just found out that my therapist lost her husband a few years ago. I’m kinda broken for her since she’s so young and don’t know how to handle this. She hasn’t really spoken about her personal life so it never came up.. but I found out indirectly.. how do I handle this? I’m not comfortable talking openly to her about this since she never bought it up.. but it’s so painful 😭 please give me some advice on how to go about it..🙏

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    rina
    Participant

    Sounds like how I felt before I found out that I have Bipolar disorder.

    I don’t know if you have it but maybe you have a disorder which can be managed so that you will feel better.

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